Protect Yourself from Ticks & Lyme Disease

A tick on a dog in Vermont - Vermont Pest Control

Everyone agrees that finding a tick on your body is one of the most unsettling pest-related experiences, but ticks are even more notorious for their ability to induce Lyme disease in humans. As is the case with all pests that harbor diseases, pathogens, and bacteria, it’s important to understand the ways that ticks work so that you can protect yourself, your family, and your pets from their bites. If you’re looking to learn more about Lyme disease and preventing ticks, read on. We’ve compiled some expert advice from our technicians at Vermont Pest Control!

What is Lyme Disease?

The deer tick, also known as the blacklegged tick, is the tick species responsible for spreading the bacterium that leads to Lyme disease. Most often, deer tick nymphs spread Lyme disease to humans, rather than adults. This is because nymphs are only about 2mm long, much less noticeable than when they’re fully grown.

Initial symptoms of Lyme disease include headaches, exhaustion, pain in muscles and joints, fever, and rashes. If left untreated, these symptoms can worsen into nerve damage and arthritis. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms and believe them to be related to a recent tick bite, reach out to a medical professional right away.

How to Avoid Ticks

To protect yourself from Lyme disease, you have to be aware of the habits and preferences of ticks. These parasitic pests hide in bushes, tall grass, or dense vegetation, waiting for small animals to walk by that they can latch on to. Lower to the ground, our dogs end up very vulnerable to tick bites, but it’s easy to come back from a long walk or hike with a tick on your own ankle, too. Here are the best ways to avoid ticks in Vermont:

  • Wear pants and long socks when walking outside in densely vegetated areas
  • Stay on the trail when hiking
  • Perform a tick check on your pets when they come back inside
  • If you find a tick attaching itself to you, use tweezers to pinch it as close to the skin as possible and gently withdraw it

Tick Control in Vermont

If you think that there is a tick presence in your backyard or the area surrounding your property, reach out to your local pest control company. Our tick exterminators at Vermont Pest Control are experts at locating tick hotspots. We can provide you with a property-wide inspection, determining areas at risk for high tick activity and applying professional tick control products to eliminate active populations. To learn more about tick prevention or to receive a free quote on tick pest control services, contact us today!

April Rain Attracts Spring Pests

A tick in Vermont - Vermont Pest Control

Keeping pests out of your home is a frustrating practice year-round here in Vermont, especially in spring. There are many reasons for spring’s infamy as a pest-ridden reason, but one of the most major of these is the amount of rainfall. The rain creates favorable conditions for all kinds of pests to thrive amongst the blooming plant growth that we see in this season. It’s important to know how to get ahead of them. Let the expert exterminators at Vermont Pest Control help out!

What Pests Love Spring Rain?

A rainy spring allows for many kinds of pests around Vermont to thrive. There are a few in particular that you should be watching out for this spring:

  1. Fleas and ticks: These parasitic pests survive by hiding out in dense plant growth, waiting for animals to walk by that they can latch onto. A rainy spring means more hiding places.
  2. Mosquitoes: Mosquitoes breed in standing water pools, from sources as big as ponds to as small as puddles. With more opportunities to proliferate, mosquitoes thrive after a rainy spring.
  3. Fire ants: Soil softens after a rainy spring, making it easy for fire ants and other subterranean ants to expand their colonies.
  4. Beetles: Lots of rainfall in spring means our gardens will flourish, but it also gives beetles easy access to plentiful food.
  5. Termites: Sometimes called rain flies, winged termite swarmers come out after a rain to take advantage of damaged wood.

What Can I Do to Prevent Pests During a Rainy Spring?

A rainy spring won’t only make your yard a pest hotspot, it could also lead to pest problems inside your home. We recommend adding these measures to your cleaning routines to prevent pest infestations this spring:

  • Seal any cracks and gaps: Fill in any gaps you find around your doors and windows with weather stripping or screens, whichever you see fit. Cracks in the exterior of your house in walls, roofing, foundation, or otherwise can be filled with a silicone-based caulk.
  • Ensure your gutters are clear: Leaves and other natural debris can build up in your gutters. This can either lead to overflows or perfect standing water sources for mosquitoes to breed in.
  • Prevent standing water from pooling up: Anywhere that standing water pools, pests will come, and this includes the interior of your home. Wipe up any water spills in the kitchen or bathroom promptly.

How Vermont Pest Control Can Help This Spring

If you feel that pest problems are inevitable every spring, ask your local pest control company how they can help. Our team at Vermont Pest Control is well versed in our local pest issues. We can assess your property for vulnerabilities, exterminate active pests, and teach you how to avoid your recurring pest problems going forward. Contact our team today to learn more about how we can help you and receive a free estimate!

Can Ticks Survive through Winter?

A tick in Vermont - Vermont Pest Control

It’s easy to assume that when winter rolls around, we can all stop worrying about the outdoor pests that bothered us in the summer. Many pests that live outdoors during the heat try to sneak inside for a bit of warmth during the winter, and others’ numbers tend to dip drastically. However, ticks tend to make do with what they can find in the fall, surviving through the winter in most cases. To learn more about how ticks survive the winter and what you can do to avoid them, read on. Our tick control experts at Vermont Pest Control deal with parasitic pests all year long and have developed seasonal strategies to get rid of them.

When Are Ticks In Season?

Many people know that ticks are most active in the heat. Many of us find that walking our dogs in the summer can be a hassle, because performing a tick check after walking in tall grass often leads to the discovery of a tick or two. Humidity plays a large role in their survivability, too. Because they don’t drink water, ticks prefer to live in environments upward of 85% average humidity to keep hydrated.

So, if they need heat and humidity, do ticks die in winter? Not always. Although a harsh winter can wipe them out, here are some ways ticks survive through the cold seasons:

  • If they find an unknowing animal host to latch onto, they can use them for their body heat and nutrients through the winter
  • If they fail to find a host, many ticks will hide in the leaf litter of wooded environments for protection and insulation as they go into a dormant stage
  • Soft-shell ticks will burrow underground for a greater amount of protection

How to Avoid Winter Ticks

Tick activity drops dramatically when temperatures fall below 45 degrees and the ground is wet or icy. However,even though you’re less likely to deal with them when it’s colder, winter tick problems can still be a hassle for you and your pets. Here are some ways to protect yourself from ticks this winter:

  1. Clear out your yard waste as often as you can. Ticks could be hiding in your leaf piles, so it’s best to get rid of them quickly.
  2. Check your pets. Ticks love to latch onto our dogs, so after letting them outside or taking them on a walk, inspect them for any signs of ticks.
  3. Ask for help from your local tick exterminators. Setting up a barrier treatment in your yard can make your property an inhabitable place for ticks.

Tick Control in the Winter

Deer ticks, infamous for being able to induce Lyme disease in humans, are living here in Vermont. If you want to be extra careful and protect your family from the dangers of ticks, you can rely on your local pest control company. Our team has 30 years of experience in tick control in our state, and can leave you feeling comfortable and secure in your tick-free home. For a free quote, contact us today!

Get Ready for Increased Fall-Winter Pest Activity

A rat inside a home in Vermont - Vermont Pest Control

Vermont is perhaps most famous for its seasonality. Our dense and healthy forests give way to winter in the most vibrant exhibition of autumn colors in the country. While our state’s flora is a sight to behold, it also creates a perfect environment for all sorts of fauna to thrive.

If you’re looking to learn the best ways to protect your home from pest problems this fall and winter, read on. We’ve put together some information and advice from our technicians at Vermont Pest Control!

Pests in Vermont in Fall and Winter

Unique weather conditions that we experienced over the summer are resulting in an altered pest environment this fall. With a mixture of higher average temperatures and earlier consistent rain, we’ve seen elevated tick and mosquito activity. Both of these blood-drawing pests are most at home in warm and wet conditions. This year’s weather has allowed them to sustain their breeding populations for longer than usual.

However, in the winter to come, rodents are going to take over as the most prominent pests in the state. Early rain is indicative of earlier snowfall, which will force rats and mice to look for warmer shelters to take refuge in. We have removed many rodents from our customers’ crawl spaces, walls, and attics.

The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) released it’s biannual bug barometer—you can read the full report here.

2021 Bug Barometer - Vermont Pest Control

Preventing Pests in the Cold Seasons

When the highs stop breaching 50 degrees, and even more so when snow starts to fall consistently, we have to change the way we think about pest prevention to account for active pests. These are our three main pointers for conducting your own pest control this fall and winter:

  1. Make sure your home is intact. Look around the exterior of your home for cracks in the walls and foundation, broken roof tiles, vents, and plumbing fixtures, or gaps around your doors and windows. Rats and mice can squeeze through smaller holes than you would imagine.
  2. Keep your yard maintained. Piles of yard waste should be cleared out often and your grass could be cut short to keep potential pest hiding places minimized. Storing your firewood outside and off of the ground will help you reduce the risk of an infestation.
  3. Be careful with trash and food. Take your trash out often and use sealable bins. Also, be sure to seal your food in airtight containers and wash dishes promptly after eating.

Vermont Pest Control’s Fall and Winter Services

Whether you need extra help getting ready to protect your home against rodents this winter or are dealing with bugs in your yard currently, you can count on your local pest control company to take over. At Vermont Pest Control, we pride ourselves on our holistic approach to pest removal—a complete property inspection, followed by safe and efficient extermination or removal services, capped off with preventative maintenance work to keep your home pest-free going forward. Contact us today for a free quote on pest control services!

How to Dislodge Ticks Safely

American dog tick found in Vermont - Vermont Pest Control

Ticks come out again every spring and summer to look for animals to feed on. Their diets can range from birds, to deers, to rodents and other small mammals, but unfortunately, also extend to us and our pets. These sneaky pests are not just a nuisance, they are also capable of causing serious illnesses, including the daunting Lyme disease. To prepare yourself for the height of tick season, you can learn about the types of ticks in your area and the best actions to take once you’ve been bitten.

What Types of Ticks Live in Vermont?

There are several species of ticks living in our area, but three of them stand out as the most prominent:

  • Lone star tick: With their elongated mouthparts and characteristic white spot on their back, the lone star tick is easily identifiable. You’ll often find them in wooded areas where lots of small animals live.
  • American dog tick: These ticks have a very similar anatomy to the lone star tick, but are more reddish-brown in color and have smaller mouthparts. American dog ticks’ common targets are, you guessed it, dogs. This doesn’t stop them from going after humans, though!
  • Deer tick: The deer tick is widely feared for its ability to transmit the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. They are smaller and darker in color than the previously mentioned ticks, making them hard to spot.

Although you can only contract Lyme disease from a deer tick bite, each one of these tick species has been known to carry several kinds of dangerous diseases.

How to Remove a Tick Safely

It’s important to remove ticks from your skin as soon as you notice them to avoid contracting a disease. The CDC has laid out these steps for safe tick removal:

  1. Pinch the tick closely to the surface of the skin using a pair of tweezers.
  2. Pull the tick out of the skin with a slow and steady motion. Twisting the tweezers while pulling could cause the tick’s mouthparts to break off in your skin. If this happens, you can use the tweezers to take them out afterward.
  3. After removing the tick, clean the area of the bite with rubbing alcohol or soap and warm water.
  4. Get rid of the tick by flushing it down the toilet, throwing it away in a sealed trash can, or putting it in alcohol. Do not use your bare hands to squish it.

You can decrease your chances of developing an illness by removing ticks from your skin as soon as possible. If you start to notice signs of a fever or a rash within 2-3 weeks of a recent tick bite, talk to a medical professional about your symptoms.

Tick Extermination Services in Vermont

If you’re already noticing a heightened population of ticks near your home or around your property, ask your local pest control company about what they can do. The tick experts at Vermont Pest Control have years of experience dealing with all kinds of ticks in our region. Contact us today to find out how we can help you get rid of your tick problem!

Afraid of Rodents and Bugs? 2021 May Not Be Your Year

Vermont Pest Control

Entomologists from Vermont Pest Control’s parent company, Rentokil Provide their Pest Predictions for 2021

READING, Penn. (Jan. 4, 2021) — As if 2020 didn’t present enough challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, 2021 could be a banner year for pests around the country.

To help residents prepare for 2021, entomologists from Rentokil used field knowledge and data to provide their predictions for pests in the upcoming year.

1. Rodents, Rodents Everywhere:

With shutdowns across the country, it’s no surprise that rodents are on the rise nationwide. Empty buildings, the scarcity of food and warmer winters have combined to create a rodent apocalypse.

“We’re seeing more rats in urban, suburban and rural settings because of the shutdowns,” said Marc Potzler, Board Certified Entomologist. “Food sources are cut off, and rats are having to travel to scavenge for food. We’ve seen rats out in public during the day, which is highly unusual.”

Warmer winters have also allowed for mice populations to boom in residential areas as it allows for a longer breeding season and there is a lower population loss due to hard freezes.

“Right now is the perfect time to rodent-proof your home,” said Potzler. “Make sure to repair any gaps on the exterior of your home, such as around garage doors, windows or pipes.”

2. Mosquitoes on the Move:

Mosquitoes populations have been increasing over the last few years. Aedes species, which are disease-carrying mosquitoes, are also moving to new areas. These mosquitoes can carry West Nile Virus, Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) and Zika virus, among other diseases.

“There is an increase of mosquitoes across the country, but notably on the West Coast, and they are adapting each year,” said Eric Sebring, Associate Certified Entomologist. “We have seen evidence of behavior adaptation, where mosquitoes lay their eggs strategically to hatch throughout the season.”

Protect yourself and your family from mosquitoes by removing any standing water on your property. Mosquitoes can breed in as little as one teaspoon of water. Also, wear EPA-approved insect repellent while spending time outside.

3. Bed Bugs:

The chatter about bed bugs was quiet in 2020, but that’s not because they have gone away.

“As people begin to travel again, we will start to hear about bed bug infestations,” said Sebring. “Bed bugs can be dormant for several months at a time, so they can emerge when a food source, humans, become available.”

Bed bugs are considered hitchhikers, traveling from place to place on people, luggage, clothing and other personal belongings. Homeowners and businesses such as hotels, colleges, hospitals, senior living facilities, retail stores, and libraries have experienced problems with bed bugs.

If traveling, inspect the bed by pulling back the sheets to examine the mattress. Check your luggage before packing and unpacking, and look for signs of living or dead bugs the size of an apple seed or black fecal smears.

4. More Time Outdoors = More Pests.

From hiking to gardening to dining al fresco, there is no doubt that the pandemic has forced people to spend more time outdoors.

In 2021, we will see the outdoor pest pressures continue:

Ticks: Ticks are responsible for transmitting several diseases, including Lyme disease, to humans and animals. These small insects are found in grassy areas and in the woods, so it is important to inspect yourself and your pets after spending time outdoors. Cover as much skin as possible while outdoors, wear long pants, long sleeves, closed-toed shoes, and tuck pant legs into socks. Light-colored clothing will also help any ticks you pick up stand out.

Ants: “As soon as the weather starts to warm up, we will see an increase in ant populations,” said Tom Dobrinska, Board Certified Entomologist. “Most of the ants we are dealing with are odorous house ants. When spending time outside, make sure to clean up any food, water or sugary substances and ensure that your home is free of any holes or cracks for them to enter.”

Stinging Insects: Stinging insects, such as wasps and yellow jackets, emerge at the first sign of warm weather, and as warm weather seasons are getting longer, stinging insects have more time to create issues. Make sure you check for nests early in the spring as they are smaller and get early nest treatment. Make sure to keep windows and doors shut, and secure outside bins so stinging insects are not attracted to the contents.

5. Termites Aren’t Going Anywhere

Termites are a pesky problem, and unfortunately, are not going anywhere. Termites can cause extensive damage to structures, especially homes. As people are moving out of cities during the pandemic to more suburban areas, education about termite protection is key.

“We received more calls for termites this past year than we have in many years,” said Potzler. “It’s important to raise awareness for homeowners now to have proactive protection to keep from costly repairs in the future.”

6. Pests in the News:

There are a few pests that will continue to steal the limelight in 2021.

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is an invasive pest that has been making its way across the country since it was first introduced from Asia in 2001. Besides its pungent odor, this stink bug has become a nuisance for homeowners as it gathers in large numbers on the sides of houses and buildings and enters through small cracks in the home. “The brown marmorated stink bug is here to stay,” said Dobrinska. “We will continue to see this species emerge in late spring in large numbers.”

The Spotted Lanternfly will continue to wreak havoc across the Northeast and beyond. The invasive pest, first found in Pennsylvania in 2014, is spreading across the Northeast, with New York reporting its first sighting this year. The pest can significantly damage trees and plants.

“The Spotted Lanternfly is becoming a big problem in the Northeast, and it will continue to spread,” said Potzler. “It can be devastating for agriculture and is a nuisance for homeowners.”

The egg masses look like a smear of mud on trees and outside of homes. It’s important to scrape the egg mass off, put it in a bag with rubbing alcohol and throw it away, and then call the state department of agriculture.

The infamous “Murder Hornet,” also known as the Asian giant hornet, grabbed many headlines, causing homeowners to panic trying to decipher the difference between stinging insects in their yards and this aggressive species. The Asian giant hornet is the largest hornet species in the world, growing up to 3 inches in length. Currently, the Asian giant hornet has only been found in the Pacific Northwest.

“We know that there was one colony found and eliminated in Washington State,” said Sebring. “Unfortunately, if there is one, there will be more.”

While your chances of being stung by an Asian giant hornet are fairly low, the sting can be dangerous as the venom volume is higher, causing more pain. The hives are primarily built underground or in hollows in trees. If you suspect it is an Asian giant hornet or any stinging pests, call your pest management provider to assess the situation as soon as you spot activity.

The Dangers of Fleas & Ticks in Vermont

Ticks and fleas are dangerous and can transmit disease in Vermont - Vermont Pest Control

Fleas and ticks may be tiny insects, but they can be two of the most dangerous pests. This is because they are parasitic, meaning they have to feed on the blood of their hosts to survive. As if this wasn’t scary enough—fleas and ticks are capable of transmitting some of the world’s most dangerous diseases. Cats and dogs are most commonly affected by fleas and ticks, but are they dangerous to people as well? Unfortunately, yes! Ticks in particular can transmit blood-borne diseases (including Lyme disease) to people. For this reason, it’s very important to do everything in your power to prevent fleas and ticks on your family and pets.

Diseases Spread by Fleas

When you think of fleas, you likely think of your pets. In addition to getting on your pets, fleas are often brought into the home on rodents if you have an infestation. Although it’s rare, fleas can get onto humans, too. These tiny, reddish brown insects can cause itchy bites and, in serious cases, allergic reactions. Fleas have been linked back to typhus, plague, cat scratch disease, and tapeworms. Because these diseases can be dangerous for you and your pets, it’s essential to prevent fleas.

Tick-Borne Diseases

Ticks can similarly latch onto pets or people, especially outdoors in areas with high grass. There are several types of ticks, and many of them are able to transmit disease. The most common of these is Lyme disease which, if left untreated, can cause damage to the heart and nervous system. Other diseases associated with ticks include Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMDF), Ehrlichiosis, and Tularemia. With such a list, it’s crucial to stay aware of ticks whenever you are outdoors.

How to Prevent Fleas & Ticks

To prevent fleas and ticks, the number one thing you can do is regularly check your pets for them. Especially after a walk or hike, look at your cat or dog’s fur for these tiny insects. Also consider getting preventative medicines from your veterinarian. Fleas and ticks are most often carried by rodents and wildlife. To prevent the parasitic insects, you must also prevent nuisance wildlife infestations. To do so, try implementing the following tips:

  1. Keep a tidy and clean landscape by avoiding piles of debris, mowing the lawn, and trimming back trees and foliage.
  2. Ensure garbage cans are securely stored with a tight-fitting lid.
  3. Don’t leave pet food—or any other food for that matter—outside.
  4. Because fleas cannot survive in direct sunlight, keeping your home and yard sunny may be a natural deterrent.
  5. Seal holes and any areas of entry into the home to detract rodents from getting inside. 

Preventing Fleas and Ticks in Vermont

Vermont is home to both of these dangerous insects, making it important to learn how to effectively prevent them. If you notice flea or ticks nearby and have more questions, the residential pest control experts at Vermont Pest Control are here to help. Contact us today to learn more!

How to Prevent Fleas and Ticks in Vermont

Ticks are a common pest problem in Vermont - Learn more from Vermont Pest Control

Vermont summers are beautiful, making more people want to spend time outdoors. Unfortunately, ticks and fleas are common in the summertime. Not only are these pests a nuisance, they can be very dangerous as well. These two insects are both parasitic, meaning they feed on the blood of their hosts to survive. Ticks in particular pose an immense risk in that they can pass blood-borne diseases, such as Lyme disease, to their hosts. Cats and dogs are most commonly affected by fleas and ticks, and can spread them throughout your home once indoors. Rats and mice are also known to bring these pests indoors. The team at Vermont Pest Control is here with tips on how to prevent fleas and ticks in your property this summer and all year long.

Dangers of Fleas and Ticks

Fleas often attach to cats or dogs outside as they nestle in fur and spread to items inside the home. Rats and mice also bring them indoors sometimes. These tiny, reddish brown insects can cause itchy bites and, in serious cases, allergic reactions. Fleas can spread easily, making them a pain to deal with once they get inside.

Just like fleas, ticks latch onto the fur of animals as well as clothing and skin. An infestation is often caused when they’ve infested a rodent, raccoon, or another animal near the home. Certain ticks, such as the brown dog tick, does well living indoors, and many species of ticks transmit a number of viruses or infections. The most common tick-borne illness is Lyme disease. If left untreated, this disease can cause damage to the heart and nervous system.

5 Ways to Prevent Fleas & Ticks

No one wants to deal with fleas and ticks in the summer. In addition to getting any pets treated for fleas regularly, it’s important to make sure you implement preventative measures outside the home to keep fleas and ticks away. There are several things you can do to prevent fleas and ticks:

  1. Keep a tidy landscape by avoiding piles of debris, keeping garbage stored carefully, and trimming back trees and foliage.
  2. Don’t leave pet food outside.
  3. Fleas cannot survive in direct sunlight, so keeping your home and yard sunny may be a natural deterrent.
  4. Avoid walking in areas with high brush.
  5. Seal holes and any areas of entry into the home to detract rodents from getting inside.

Need Flea or Tick Control?

Getting fleas or ticks can be very overwhelming. When you have them, it’s important to get professional help to remove them. The team at Vermont Pest Control is here to help keep you and your family safe from these parasitic insects year-round in Vermont. Contact our team today to learn more!

Is Coronavirus Transmitted by Mosquitoes or Ticks?

Mosquitoes do not transmit coronavirus. Vermont Pest Control

Mosquitoes and ticks play a role in the transmission of many global diseases, but to date, coronavirus is not one of them. Here at Vermont Pest Control, we know how distressing things are during these uncertain times. New information about COVID-19 is being released every hour, and our team is closely monitoring the situation. As always, our focus continues to be the safety and health of our communities in Vermont. For that reason, we’re here to dispel the myth that mosquitoes and ticks spread coronavirus. They are responsible for transmitting many vector-borne diseases, which are not spread from person to person as COVID-19 is. Using information from the CDC, we’ve compiled the facts into this new blog post. Keep reading to learn more!

Coronavirus vs. Mosquito & Tick-Borne Diseases

Mosquito-borne and tick-borne diseases are unlike COVID-19 mainly in the fact that they do not spread from person to person. It’s important to know how this virus is reported to spread:

  • Coronavirus is a respiratory virus that is spread from person to person. Vector-borne diseases are not.
  • Research has shown that this virus spreads from droplets from saliva or nasal discharge, often generated when an infected person sneezes or coughs. This virus can also be spread when contact is made with contaminated surfaces.
  • Avoiding exposure with infected persons is the best way to prevent this virus. It is very contagious, which is not the case with vector-borne diseases.

Worldwide Vector-Borne Diseases

They may not transmit coronavirus, but mosquitoes and ticks historically transmit some of the world’s most dangerous diseases. These two insects are vectors. Vector-borne diseases are different than coronavirus in several ways. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), “vector-borne diseases are human illnesses caused by parasites, viruses and bacteria that are transmitted by vectors”. These dangerous diseases include:

  1. Mosquitoes are infamous for transmitting malaria, Zika virus, West Nile virus, chikungunya, yellow fever, and more.
  2. Lyme disease, currently the most common vector-borne disease in the nation, is transmitted by ticks.

Vermont Pest Control is Here For You!

Mosquitoes and ticks do not transmit coronavirus, but they are certainly dangerous. During these uncertain times, we know that pests are still a problem for residents throughout Vermont. Our team is continuing to provide essential pest control services right now and all year long for the safety of our people and communities.

As the COVID-19 situation unfolds, we encourage our customers to seek more information and follow guidelines released by the WHOCDC, as well as your state and local public health agencies.